About

 

Welcome to the all new www.fullbodyburn.com!

Completely redesigned. Completely rethought. Completely regurgitated. Diced, battered, and deep fried until crispy and golden brown… it’s Full¥Body¥Burn Productions!!!!!!!!!

First of all, there’s a lot of stuff here. You can find the Stuff (TM) using the navigation menu at right. It’s divided conveniently by subjects that will lead you to the major pages. There are also posts — pages that don’t quite qualify as major pages and so aren’t on the navigation menu. New material is announced in a post, and is usually also linked in a page. So, look at the “what’s new” boxes underneath the navigation menu to see what’s new. If you’re not really all that interested in what’s new… well… don’t, I suppose.

Longtime fans of the Tinwhistle Fingering Research Center and Full¥Body¥Burn Productions will notice a few changes around the website. First of all, management of the website has been completely turned over to Telford, an agreeable rapscallion of a hand puppet and President and CEO of Telford Holdings, Inc., the parent company of Evil Goblin Music & Weapons Systems. Telford has expanded fullbodyburn.com to not only be the premier Internet resource for free tinwhistle fingering information and a repository for a sizable and ever-growing collection of free sheet music of questionable worth and taste, but also to include information on some of his favorite fields of study: fairy tales, puppetry, ventriloquism, and bacon.

Those interested in keeping up with the site — when changes are made, when new songs or stories are added, when additional resources are posted, and when Telford makes any exciting discovery in the realm of bacon eatology — can do so by connecting with Telford on Facebook. (Please note: Tinwhistle fans, you will also see posts about puppetry. Puppetry fans, you will also see posts about tinwhistles. I won’t say anything at all specifically to the bacon fans, because everybody is a fan of bacon. However, Telford rarely posts more than once in any given twenty-four hour period, so no one has to worry too much about their feed being inundated with things that aren’t very interesting. Unless you think everything that a hard-working monster has to say is not very interesting. In which case, just bookmark the site and check back from time to time. Sheesh.)

If you’ve got thoughts to share, comments to make, bridges to burn, or axes to grind, you can contact Telford directly at webmaster@fullbodyburn.com.

Enjoy!

  26 Responses to “About”

  1. Trying to get a fingering chart for C penny whistle. It seems a long journey and have arrived here, hoping for some luck this time.

    Many thanks
    Marian

    • Yep; you’ll find it here. (http://fullbodyburn.com/?attachment_id=134)

      However, I really, really mean it when I say you’ll most likely probably be a lot better off in the long run if you learn the “D” fingerings and transpose for the C whistle. Probably. And I mean that unequivocally.

      But, do whatever you like. After all, the only reason to play tinwhistle is because it makes you happy. Well, that and it’s good for world peace.

      –T

      • so I have what I know to be a C penny whistle but only wholy covered fingerings work I wondered if you have a chart for me?

      • maybe I could get you to post the song fenario for penny whistle? or send it to me directly would be a HUGE help. as well as bringing in the sheaves?

    • C whistle fingering. Er give it to a tenor sax player and tell them to use the same fingering as their sax. In other words use d fingering and transpose the music a tone?????????????????????

  2. hey my name is Sean i am a big fan of the Muppet are you ?

  3. I have an antique piccolo with 6 holes and 6 keys. Modern flute gave me fingerings for 2 octaves but I was wondering (and he refered me to you) if there were fingerings for the upper octave.
    Thanks, Patty

    • The short answer is this: almost certainly yes.

      However, what those fingerings are exactly depend on the manufacturer of the flute and what the particular keys are designed to do. There’s not really a complete standardization here, especially on antique instruments. I am going to assume you tried the standard third-octave fingerings as in the chart already. You should also try the alternative fingerings that Andrew Olmsted sent in. Look for them on the Alternative Fingerings page (http://fullbodyburn.com/?page_id=163) about halfway down.

      Ultimately, you’re probably going to have to experiment some. Get yourself a good tuner and a place far away from cats and other nervous animals and try the third-octave fingerings, then add in the key nearest to your last covered hole and see if that makes it better or worse. You ought to be able to pick up a pattern pretty quick. Usually, a six-hole instrument with added keys, the keys are on there so that the accidentals will be more in tune than they would be through cross-fingering. Usually, that works pretty good but sometimes you’re still better off with cross-fingering the six main holes and ignoring the keys — especially at the extreme end of the range.

      I hope that helps some; good luck, and let me know how it works out for you.

      –T

      • Hi, I am having trouble getting the high A and beyond and I also need high Ab and high Bb and some trill fingerings. I’ll keep trying but if you have anything else you can recommend please let me know. thanks, Patty

  4. Thanks for your great job doing this site, and also, thanks for your 3rd-octave fingering chart!.
    Here’s a Spanish beginner, trying to get a Susato D to enjoy celtic tunes.

    Again, thanks!

    Cesar

  5. I’VE STUMBLED UPON YOUR SITE IN MY SEARCH FOR GUITAR CHORDS FOR SOM IRISH TUNES. MOST RECENTLY, I WAS LOOKING FOR “THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE CORN”. IS IT POSSIBLE TO USE THE MUSIC TO THAT YOU HAVE FOR THE TIN WHISTLE AND USE IT FOR THE GUITAR? IF NOT, CAN YOU SUGGEST A SITE THAT WOULD ACCOMMODATE MY DESIRE FOR GUITAR CHORDS FOR IRISH TUNES?

    THANK YOU

    • IT OUGHT TO BE POSSIBLE. POSSIBLY. I DON’T REALLY KNOW. I DON’T PLAY GUITAR. PEOPLE WHO DO FRIGHTEN ME. WHY ARE WE SHOUTING?! –T

  6. My husband wants me to get the theme from Gilligians Island for my Penny Whistle, any chance? Could go in the nautical section! lol

    • Good idea. I love that whacky Gilligan. I mean, not in the same way I love Mary Ann, but in a strictly fraternal way. –T

  7. Hello – firstlty: excellent site – very helpful to a whistle novice like me.I have a question which I hope you might be able to advise me on: I play mostly irish music (on mandolin and tenor banjo) – and I am now hoping to learn whistle too. More than 75% of the tunes I play are in the Key of D and received wisdom would say to start with a mezzo D whistle. However, in many of the sessions I play in there are whistlers with mezzo D whistles (some of them very good players indeed) and I notice that their whistles are very loud – a good thing for a good player in a session with lots of instruments going at it full blast; perhaps not so good for a novice player sitting in his room driving the family and the neighbours mad. I have tried an alto A whistle (a Chieftan) and it was very nice and notiiceably softer than the mezzo D whistles I have heard and tried. I understand that an A whistle will readily play in the key of D (and Bm) – my question is: will it go high enough for the top A’s and sometimes B’s which often occur in the second lines of Irish tunes (in D)? These A’s and B’s would be (I think) at the bottom end of the third register on an A whistle. Are they easy to get on a good quality whistle such as a Chieftan or an Alba etc or are they perceived as generally pushing the instrument to the very limit and not really within the scope of a novice such as myself?

    Hope you can help, regards Pete

  8. Please, can you tell me where I can find BLANK pages with the tin whistle fingering? I’ve been looking for a few days now…

    THANKS! And your web site is awesome!

  9. Seeking whistle tablature for Going My Way, That’s An Irish Lullaby, Jesu’ Joy Of Man’s Desiring.

    Thanks!

  10. Hi-
    I was referred to you by a whistler in Galway. I received an ‘Irish’ flute as a gift. It has no
    brand mark that I can see. It is a quality instrument, wood and nickel, plays in tune nicely.
    I have been unable to find a fingering chart for it, and I am struggling with the altissimo fingering.
    It is in D, but the odd bit is it has 5 keys. Eb, 2 F keys, Ab and Bb.
    I have seen six-key charts, but no five-key charts. Do you have any suggestions?
    Anything would help.
    Thanks! Joe

  11. I play only C whistles. The fingering as I have best found it is from bottom note with all holes covered, is to half-hole bottom hole for c# and likewise, then D is bottom open, D# is half-hole 2nd hole and so on. G is top two of the bottom three (2 + 3 holes from bottom) are covered, A is only topmost hole (6) covered, A# /B-flat is holes 4 and 5 from bottom covered, or the typically- added 1 and 3 covered holes, from bottom added, use your ear as to which is best. These can all be figured out if you listen and try to remember what suits best. Nancy Morse

  12. This page rocks!! I mean it, the best one EVER!

  13. Many thanks to Fullbodyburn and Richard for the fingering chart.!
    I have at last found the “Holy Grail ”
    You have all created an excellent site. Vibrant and working.
    Best Wishes
    Kenneth.

  14. I just found your site and am amazed! I’m just learning on a D whistle and really appreciate your work. Thank you so much!!

  15. And I thought I was lost

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